Of course the Pi runs NetBSD

NetBSD
NetBSD, a rather good Unix-like operating system has released support for the Raspberry Pi Zero amongst other Raspberry Pi boards. Version 7.1 was made available on 11 March and can be downloaded from the NetBSD site. Instructions are also provided.

I first came across BSD years ago when a version was supplied on a magazine's cover disk for the Amiga. It started my absolute love of Unix, which culminated in my purchasing two Sun workstations (an Ultra 5 and Ultra 10) to run Solaris some years back. The FreeBSD project has a page that briefly covers the history of the various BSD operating systems and is worth a read.

What is very, very notable about Unix and BSD is stability: the release cycles are such that upgrades happen at a steady pace with very stable component packages. Oh, and to add: NetBSD supports a ridiculous list of computers. Scanning through that list I can see the Acorn Archimedes, Amiga (huzzah!), Cobalt Microservers (I owned a Sun Cobalt Raq 4 for quite a while), Psion PDAs (yes, really), Sega Dreamcast (yes, really really) and many more.

As NetBSD's tagline says: "Of course it runs NetBSD".

I am definitely going to be running NetBSD on one of my Raspberry Pi boards soon. If you are looking for an interesting alternative to Raspbian then do give NetBSD a try.
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Zumo George gets upgrades (part 1)

Everything eventually needs an upgrade. You may think that pencil 1.0 was great, but if Apple has taught us anything: we all need pencil 2.0. I jest, although that said it is time for Zumo George, one of my Raspberry Pi robots to receive the 2.0 make-over. This is brought on by two things:


Previously I had thought of upgrading from the Raspberry Pi A+ to a Zero purely to save some space, enabling me to get a bit o'real-estate back as George measure but 10cm x 10cm. However I would still have the WiFi dongle a-dongling, only it would be dangling from a micro to full-size USB. Dongles dangling from dongles (there's a song in there somewhere) made me sad: "if only a variant of the Zero came with WiFi", I thought. Fantastic news Pi fans: the Foundation delivered.

The Raspberry Pi Zero W is essentially a Zero (same CPU, same RAM, same form factor) with the added bonus of a combined WiFi and Bluetooth chip. Also for our inner geek the Foundation has included the coolest antenna I've seen yet which features a triangular resonant cavity. The MagPi magazine covered the antenna in detail just the other day in Issue 55. Proant, a Swedish company, have licensed the tech to the Foundation.
TheMagPi_55_ZeroWAntenna
The MagPi, Issue 55. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Given the move to the slimmest of Raspberry Pi's it is also time to move from the Pimoroni Explorer Pro to the Explorer pHAT. This half-pint size board has many of the features of it's larger sibling and is a perfect match for the Zero W.

Putting it all together here are collection of parts:

Zumo George Pi Zero W upgrade

Any observant bod will quickly notice something missing. Yes I hang my head in shame and join the "forgot to order a 40-pin header for the Zero" club. D'oh! eBay quickly to the rescue. Given this tiny omission the build is on temporary hold for a few days. Still, let's get the blade in place because sumo blades == awesome. While we're at it let's have a preview of where the Zero is going to go. With all ports along one long edge I can now have these poking backwards from George. You can also see the extra space I am gaining from the move to the Zero W from the A+.

ZumoGeorge_sumo_blade

I am expecting great things from the sumo blade and am already thinking about how to modify my BDD behaviours and code to take advantage: Zumo George shall no longer retreat in fear from Cartmanzilla.

Stay tuned for Part 2, entitled: "Ahah the header has arrived!"

PS: yes those wires are going to get significantly shortened ;)
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It's MeArm Pi on Kickstarter

Kickstarter can be a wonderful place to support great new ideas. One project that has sprung up and captured the hearts, minds (and pledges) of folk is MeArm Pi from Mime Industries. Following on from the very successful original MeArm robot arm Mime are presenting something great to the Raspberry Pi community. The project has already smashed it's £10k goal with almost £47k pledged at the time of writing. Doing the maths on the pledges that represents 844 arms at present. That's a lot of robotic hands to shake! Best of all: you still have until 6pm on March 8 to support the project and acquire your very own robot arm.

Mime describes MeArm Pi as "easy to assemble and not requiring extensive knowledge of electronics, the MeArm Pi STEM kit helps kids and adults learn robotics and teaches them how to code." That's cool. Very cool: robot arms are fun, programming is fun, and programming robot arms is twice the fun.

MeArm Pi

I briefly interviewed Ben Pirt joint founder of Mime. His passion for the new MeArm is clear: a desire to create a functioning robotic arm platform that simplifies the construction process enormously.

CD: What was the motivation to change the design of MeArm for MeArm Pi?

Ben: "The first MeArm has been built thousands of times (including a fair few times ourself!) and we wanted to broaden its appeal and try get even more children involved in making and programming it. So we decided to look at which parts of the build were particularly difficult. The number of screws came out as a big issue that was catching people out so we tried to re-work the design wherever possible not to need screws. Now the only screws left are on the joints where two pieces hinge together. The grip had a major re-work (from 9 screws down to 1) which made it much simpler to build."

It's worth pausing and considering this: the number of screws and fiddly components in a build really can influence the complexity and hence accessibility of the product. When I received the Maplin robot arm for Christmas a few years back I spent several hours putting together gear boxes, ensuring all was aligned and assembling the thing. While highly enjoyable in its own way (who doesn't like to build things) it was also frustrating: that's a lot of components to assemble *just* to get a fairly simple robot arm up and running! Mime's keen attempt to solve this build complexity problem is admirable.

Once I had built the Maplin arm I wanted to program it using a record and playback mechanism in Python. It was at this point I hit a few snags as precision playback just isn't easily possible with normal motors, and again it looks like MeArm Pi has overcome this issue.

CD: How accurate are the servos with MeArm Pi, i.e.: can you reliably pre-program repeatable movements?

Ben: "The servos are pretty accurate - they use metal gears for extra reliability. The big difference from the Maplin arm is that servos can be relied upon to be nicely repeatable so you can program them to do things again and again. Servos won’t drift out of calibration like motors."

Having non-drifting motors sounds like a dream come true! Don't get me wrong: I love the Maplin arm and easily recommend it to everyone as a low-cost way to get into robotics on the Raspberry Pi. Now though, Mime are offering a viable alternative that combines the hardware with ease of programming. Talking of programming, I asked Ben what else makes the MeArm so great:

Ben: "I think there are a lot of things that make the MeArm Pi better than the Maplin arm:
  • children build it themselves so they get a better understanding of how the mechanics works
  • the motor control is easier from the Raspberry Pi and can be programmed in any number of programming languages
  • the software is better and more suited to beginners"

It's worth noting that supplying purpose built control software to get up and running quickly is a great idea: it's what makes projects like Pi-Top so readily accessible for instance. Software for the Maplin arm does exist: we covered this in earlier issues of The MagPi a couple of times however it involves getting ones head around the internals of the USB protocol and while learning about USB Vendor IDs is "fun" in one way it certainly isn't conducive to encouraging people new to robotics into the hobby.

Ben also tells me that the age range of the arm is "officially...11+ but with some parental supervision it can be built by as young as 8 or 9 without too many problems." Producing a product that is interesting and accessible to age groups from primary to adult is a great achievement: "We believe in helping children to have fun whilst learning about technology and the MeArm Pi is completely designed around that goal". Superb.

It seems that MeArm Pi is not the only product that Mime are looking at for the future too:

Ben: "This is the first new product from Mime Industries since we formed the company. We’re going to be taking another look at updates to Mirobot as well as rolling the improvements to the MeArm mechanical design over to the other versions. We’ve got lots of ideas for new products but you’ll have to stay tuned for those!"

And stay tuned I most definitely shall.

MeArm Pi, available for another 6 days on Kickstarter.

MeArm Pi
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It's all gone quantum at Digimakers

Last Saturday I had a great time at Bristol's Digimakers. I regularly attend this superb event, running a stand and get the opportunity to talk computers and science with children, parents and teachers. This time around I focused on Behaviour-Driven Development (which I've covered before) with a side order or LED and ePaper displays for the Raspberry Pi and Pi Zero from Pi-Supply.
Digimakers June 2016

Several organisations and lots of students ran demonstrations, workshops and drop-in help sessions throughout the day. This is something especially neat about Digimakers: it's not focussed on a single technology as the supposed solution to all scenarios, but instead showcases lots of complementary technologies. We had Raspberry Pi, Arduino, custom things that I don't quite understand and more besides all used as the basis for a number of very interesting projects.

The computer science and engineering students from the University of Bristol continue to impress. Anthony really hit the nail with his sound wave generator which produced a fantastic musical accompaniment for the day when hooked up to Apple's Logic Pro X. If you're reading this and looking to hire an audio engineer then he definitely deserves the job!
Andrew's marvellous musical vibrations

Directly opposite was Matthew Hockley with a swarm of cute robots that were running a simple algorithm related to locality of their neighbours triggering different light patterns. We talked about how us fallible humans like to anthropomorphise whenever given a chance to do so and I postulated that the random movement of his swarm would be seen as "good" or "evil" if he put green smiley faces or red angry faces on top of each robot. Matthew agreed that we do tend to read more into such critters than is deserved as they're not really responsible agents (an update to the Three Laws that were just a plot device for Asimov and not something to base a real robot on) as Alan Winfield notes in his excellent, accessible book, Robotics: A Very Short Introduction.


They appear to be benign, but if you look closely you can see them plotting world domination.

Students and a teacher from Cotham School were back with their arcade cabinet, and this time also had two "Mini Me" versions (as I like to think of them) present. Sadly I forgot to get a photo, but these proved extremely popular. I think the brief goes along the lines of: "yes, you can play computer games at school providing you program those games." It's a great idea, very well executed.

Talking of schools: I had a great chat with Stewart Edmondson, CEO of the UK Electronics Skills Foundation. They believe absolutely that teaching software is not enough and that kids should be getting hands on experience of electronics. I wholeheartedly agree! As I started secondary school in the 1980s I caught the last of the software-related computer lessons before "IT" became "ICT" with the "C" somehow (apparently) meaning "Word & Excel". However I never learnt electronics in school and feel very much I'm enormously behind the learning curve here. Although I've built my own circuits, read lots of tutorials in books and The MagPi magazine and bought and experimented with stacks of components it all does feel very unstructured, as though I am missing the fundamental underpinnings that school ought to have taught me. There is a huge benefit to learning things when your brain is still wired to absorb knowledge like a sponge. At Digimakers they brought along an electronics project kit called MicroBox to get those brain cells firing and this proved very popular.

Ok, so what has all this to do with the title of this post? One of the workshops focussed on Quantum Computing for kids (yes, you did read that right!) While I unfortunately was unable to get away from my stand for long enough to listen in I had a wonderful conversation with a 14 year old girl who popped over afterwards. It started in just the way you don't expect a conversation with a teenager to start: "I'm off to Google to study quantum computing as a way to break ciphers." We then conversed about such things, including a detour to discuss the shape of the universe and the relative sizes of different infinities, the difference between passive and active hacking (which, fortunately she is very aware of - this difference needs to be taught in schools!), that she'd spent the morning learning about ciphers in Python in one of the sessions and that she's already up to speed on inspecting web elements and the like... Awesome. This was the highlight of the day for me.

The next Digimakers is on October 29th at At-Bristol. If you are planning on attending you should register in advance as this event is very popular.
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Zumo George avoids Cartmanzilla at CukeUp!

BDD_for_8-year_olds
On Thursday 14th and Friday 15th April I went to CukeUp! London 2016. The Behaviour-Driven Development community met for two days to share ideas and skills relating to my favourite delivery methodology. The event was fantastic and on a par with last year. Inspired by day one, and with an open slot to deliver a lightning talk lasting just five minutes I set about writing a presentation describing Cartmanzilla versus Zumo George... at 2am... after a few beers and a rather tasty gin. The following morning I re-wrote much of my talk to eliminate 95% of the whiz-bang transitions that had somehow crept into several slides (not sure how that happened). For some reason I had also thought a clearly marked slot for a "5 minute" talk was 10 minutes in duration (proof positive that gin slows the passage of time), and quickly edited it again after confirming with Matt Wynne that 5=5 and not 5=10. Still, overall I managed to get 80% of my message across in just minutes.

Skills Matter, who hosted CukeUp! have kindly put a video of my talk online. You will need to register (painless and quick) with Skills Matter to view it.

A quick recap: Cartmanzilla the monster has invaded robot city and the plucky little robots have to keep away from him. Only Zumo George is programmable, and his general behaviours (keep away from monsters) are determined by feature files that contain behavioural specifications written in the Gherkin syntax of BDD:

Given [a precondition]
When [an event]
Then [an outcome]

Each line of the Gherkin causes a related block of test code to be executed, and when every line of test code passes your software is green, i.e.: the behaviours are working as expected.

I've covered Zumo George and the use of BDD with this robot over a few prior posts, including a specific write-up of Cartmanzilla vs Zumo George at Bristol Digimakers. What is interesting as I read back over previous posts, and I noted this in my talk, is that my first attempts to write scenarios were essentially attempts to describe the functional aspects of George, where-as my later attempts are closer to the behaviours that I originally envisaged: sneaking towards the monster when he's not paying attention and fleeing when the monster gives chase.

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