It's all gone quantum at Digimakers

Last Saturday I had a great time at Bristol's Digimakers. I regularly attend this superb event, running a stand and get the opportunity to talk computers and science with children, parents and teachers. This time around I focused on Behaviour-Driven Development (which I've covered before) with a side order or LED and ePaper displays for the Raspberry Pi and Pi Zero from Pi-Supply.
Digimakers June 2016

Several organisations and lots of students ran demonstrations, workshops and drop-in help sessions throughout the day. This is something especially neat about Digimakers: it's not focussed on a single technology as the supposed solution to all scenarios, but instead showcases lots of complementary technologies. We had Raspberry Pi, Arduino, custom things that I don't quite understand and more besides all used as the basis for a number of very interesting projects.

The computer science and engineering students from the University of Bristol continue to impress. Anthony really hit the nail with his sound wave generator which produced a fantastic musical accompaniment for the day when hooked up to Apple's Logic Pro X. If you're reading this and looking to hire an audio engineer then he definitely deserves the job!
Andrew's marvellous musical vibrations

Directly opposite was Matthew Hockley with a swarm of cute robots that were running a simple algorithm related to locality of their neighbours triggering different light patterns. We talked about how us fallible humans like to anthropomorphise whenever given a chance to do so and I postulated that the random movement of his swarm would be seen as "good" or "evil" if he put green smiley faces or red angry faces on top of each robot. Matthew agreed that we do tend to read more into such critters than is deserved as they're not really responsible agents (an update to the Three Laws that were just a plot device for Asimov and not something to base a real robot on) as Alan Winfield notes in his excellent, accessible book, Robotics: A Very Short Introduction.


They appear to be benign, but if you look closely you can see them plotting world domination.

Students and a teacher from Cotham School were back with their arcade cabinet, and this time also had two "Mini Me" versions (as I like to think of them) present. Sadly I forgot to get a photo, but these proved extremely popular. I think the brief goes along the lines of: "yes, you can play computer games at school providing you program those games." It's a great idea, very well executed.

Talking of schools: I had a great chat with Stewart Edmondson, CEO of the UK Electronics Skills Foundation. They believe absolutely that teaching software is not enough and that kids should be getting hands on experience of electronics. I wholeheartedly agree! As I started secondary school in the 1980s I caught the last of the software-related computer lessons before "IT" became "ICT" with the "C" somehow (apparently) meaning "Word & Excel". However I never learnt electronics in school and feel very much I'm enormously behind the learning curve here. Although I've built my own circuits, read lots of tutorials in books and The MagPi magazine and bought and experimented with stacks of components it all does feel very unstructured, as though I am missing the fundamental underpinnings that school ought to have taught me. There is a huge benefit to learning things when your brain is still wired to absorb knowledge like a sponge. At Digimakers they brought along an electronics project kit called MicroBox to get those brain cells firing and this proved very popular.

Ok, so what has all this to do with the title of this post? One of the workshops focussed on Quantum Computing for kids (yes, you did read that right!) While I unfortunately was unable to get away from my stand for long enough to listen in I had a wonderful conversation with a 14 year old girl who popped over afterwards. It started in just the way you don't expect a conversation with a teenager to start: "I'm off to Google to study quantum computing as a way to break ciphers." We then conversed about such things, including a detour to discuss the shape of the universe and the relative sizes of different infinities, the difference between passive and active hacking (which, fortunately she is very aware of - this difference needs to be taught in schools!), that she'd spent the morning learning about ciphers in Python in one of the sessions and that she's already up to speed on inspecting web elements and the like... Awesome. This was the highlight of the day for me.

The next Digimakers is on October 29th at At-Bristol. If you are planning on attending you should register in advance as this event is very popular.
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