It's MeArm Pi on Kickstarter

Kickstarter can be a wonderful place to support great new ideas. One project that has sprung up and captured the hearts, minds (and pledges) of folk is MeArm Pi from Mime Industries. Following on from the very successful original MeArm robot arm Mime are presenting something great to the Raspberry Pi community. The project has already smashed it's £10k goal with almost £47k pledged at the time of writing. Doing the maths on the pledges that represents 844 arms at present. That's a lot of robotic hands to shake! Best of all: you still have until 6pm on March 8 to support the project and acquire your very own robot arm.

Mime describes MeArm Pi as "easy to assemble and not requiring extensive knowledge of electronics, the MeArm Pi STEM kit helps kids and adults learn robotics and teaches them how to code." That's cool. Very cool: robot arms are fun, programming is fun, and programming robot arms is twice the fun.

MeArm Pi

I briefly interviewed Ben Pirt joint founder of Mime. His passion for the new MeArm is clear: a desire to create a functioning robotic arm platform that simplifies the construction process enormously.

CD: What was the motivation to change the design of MeArm for MeArm Pi?

Ben: "The first MeArm has been built thousands of times (including a fair few times ourself!) and we wanted to broaden its appeal and try get even more children involved in making and programming it. So we decided to look at which parts of the build were particularly difficult. The number of screws came out as a big issue that was catching people out so we tried to re-work the design wherever possible not to need screws. Now the only screws left are on the joints where two pieces hinge together. The grip had a major re-work (from 9 screws down to 1) which made it much simpler to build."

It's worth pausing and considering this: the number of screws and fiddly components in a build really can influence the complexity and hence accessibility of the product. When I received the Maplin robot arm for Christmas a few years back I spent several hours putting together gear boxes, ensuring all was aligned and assembling the thing. While highly enjoyable in its own way (who doesn't like to build things) it was also frustrating: that's a lot of components to assemble *just* to get a fairly simple robot arm up and running! Mime's keen attempt to solve this build complexity problem is admirable.

Once I had built the Maplin arm I wanted to program it using a record and playback mechanism in Python. It was at this point I hit a few snags as precision playback just isn't easily possible with normal motors, and again it looks like MeArm Pi has overcome this issue.

CD: How accurate are the servos with MeArm Pi, i.e.: can you reliably pre-program repeatable movements?

Ben: "The servos are pretty accurate - they use metal gears for extra reliability. The big difference from the Maplin arm is that servos can be relied upon to be nicely repeatable so you can program them to do things again and again. Servos won’t drift out of calibration like motors."

Having non-drifting motors sounds like a dream come true! Don't get me wrong: I love the Maplin arm and easily recommend it to everyone as a low-cost way to get into robotics on the Raspberry Pi. Now though, Mime are offering a viable alternative that combines the hardware with ease of programming. Talking of programming, I asked Ben what else makes the MeArm so great:

Ben: "I think there are a lot of things that make the MeArm Pi better than the Maplin arm:
  • children build it themselves so they get a better understanding of how the mechanics works
  • the motor control is easier from the Raspberry Pi and can be programmed in any number of programming languages
  • the software is better and more suited to beginners"

It's worth noting that supplying purpose built control software to get up and running quickly is a great idea: it's what makes projects like Pi-Top so readily accessible for instance. Software for the Maplin arm does exist: we covered this in earlier issues of The MagPi a couple of times however it involves getting ones head around the internals of the USB protocol and while learning about USB Vendor IDs is "fun" in one way it certainly isn't conducive to encouraging people new to robotics into the hobby.

Ben also tells me that the age range of the arm is "officially...11+ but with some parental supervision it can be built by as young as 8 or 9 without too many problems." Producing a product that is interesting and accessible to age groups from primary to adult is a great achievement: "We believe in helping children to have fun whilst learning about technology and the MeArm Pi is completely designed around that goal". Superb.

It seems that MeArm Pi is not the only product that Mime are looking at for the future too:

Ben: "This is the first new product from Mime Industries since we formed the company. We’re going to be taking another look at updates to Mirobot as well as rolling the improvements to the MeArm mechanical design over to the other versions. We’ve got lots of ideas for new products but you’ll have to stay tuned for those!"

And stay tuned I most definitely shall.

MeArm Pi, available for another 6 days on Kickstarter.

MeArm Pi
Comments